Events

HCIL BBL Speaker Series: Tagging the Historical CHI Video Archive (Watch-and-Hack-athon)

Event Start Date:
Thursday, January 28, 2021 - 12:30 PM
Event End Date:
Thursday, January 28, 2021 - 01:30 PM
Location
Virtual
Add to Calendar 2021-01-28 12:30:00 2021-01-28 13:30:00 HCIL BBL Speaker Series: Tagging the Historical CHI Video Archive (Watch-and-Hack-athon) This Week's Special Event: Tagging the Historical CHI Video archive (Watch-and-Hack-athon) Speakers: Catherine Plaisant & Joel ChanDate: Thur Jan 28 & every Thurs during the semesterTime: 12:30p - 1:30p EST Join us via Zoom each week at this same linkhttps://umd.zoom.us/j/98725234047 The Plan: The HCIL has worked to digitize 100's of early CHI Videos from 1983 to 2002.  Those videos show pioneering work and are important to our field.  They are starting to be posted online but most have no keywords to help people find videos of interest.  In teams (i.e. zoom rooms) we will watch a set of videos, tag them, then get back together and share impressions and thoughts about the videos we saw.   Speaker Bios: Catherine Plaisant is a Senior Research Scientist at the University of Maryland Institute for Advanced Computer Studies and Associate Director of Research of the Human-Computer Interaction Lab. Catherine earned a Doctorat d’Ingénieur degree in France (similar to an Industrial Engineering PhD). In 1988 she joined the Human-Computer Interaction Laboratory where she has been working with multidisciplinary teams on designing and evaluating new interface technologies that are useful and usable. Joel Chan is an Assistant Professor in the University of Maryland’s College of Information Studies (iSchool), and Human-Computer Interaction Lab (HCIL). His research and teaching focus on the intersection of people, information, and creativity. He wants to know how they (can best) combine to enable us to design the future(s) we want to live in. His work has been recognized with a Best Paper Award at the ASME Design Theory and Methodology conference, the Design Studies Award 2015, and supported by an NSF Doctoral Dissertation Improvement Grant. Previously, he was a Postdoctoral Research Fellow and Project Scientist in the Human-Computer Interaction Institute at Carnegie Mellon University. He received his PhD in Cognitive Psychology at the University of Pittsburgh. Want to stay in the know? The schedule for the entire semester is now available online and previous talks can be found on YouTube.  Follow us on Twitter to get the latest updates. Questions about the HCIL? Send them to hcil-info@umd.edu.   Virtual America/New_York public

This Week's Special Event: Tagging the Historical CHI Video archive (Watch-and-Hack-athon)

Speakers: Catherine Plaisant & Joel Chan
Date: Thur Jan 28 & every Thurs during the semester
Time: 12:30p - 1:30p EST

Join us via Zoom each week at this same link
https://umd.zoom.us/j/98725234047

The Plan:
The HCIL has worked to digitize 100's of early CHI Videos from 1983 to 2002.  Those videos show pioneering work and are important to our field.  They are starting to be posted online but most have no keywords to help people find videos of interest.  In teams (i.e. zoom rooms) we will watch a set of videos, tag them, then get back together and share impressions and thoughts about the videos we saw.  

Speaker Bios:
Catherine Plaisant is a Senior Research Scientist at the University of Maryland Institute for Advanced Computer Studies and Associate Director of Research of the Human-Computer Interaction Lab. Catherine earned a Doctorat d’Ingénieur degree in France (similar to an Industrial Engineering PhD). In 1988 she joined the Human-Computer Interaction Laboratory where she has been working with multidisciplinary teams on designing and evaluating new interface technologies that are useful and usable.

Joel Chan is an Assistant Professor in the University of Maryland’s College of Information Studies (iSchool), and Human-Computer Interaction Lab (HCIL). His research and teaching focus on the intersection of people, information, and creativity. He wants to know how they (can best) combine to enable us to design the future(s) we want to live in. His work has been recognized with a Best Paper Award at the ASME Design Theory and Methodology conference, the Design Studies Award 2015, and supported by an NSF Doctoral Dissertation Improvement Grant. Previously, he was a Postdoctoral Research Fellow and Project Scientist in the Human-Computer Interaction Institute at Carnegie Mellon University. He received his PhD in Cognitive Psychology at the University of Pittsburgh.

Want to stay in the know? The schedule for the entire semester is now available online and previous talks can be found on YouTube.  Follow us on Twitter to get the latest updates. Questions about the HCIL? Send them to hcil-info@umd.edu.