Events

Emotional Contagion in Online Groups as a Function of Valence and Status with Aimée A. Kane for the Organizational Teams and Technology Society (OTTRS)

Event Start Date: Friday, April 22, 2022 - 12:00 pm

Location: Virtual on Zoom

Add to Calendar Friday, April 22, 2022 12:00 pm America/New York Emotional Contagion in Online Groups as a Function of Valence and Status with Aimée A. Kane for the Organizational Teams and Technology Society (OTTRS)

Speaker:
Aimée A. Kane
Associate Professor of Management
Palumbo-Donahue School of Business
Duquesne University

Abstract:
This study examines emotional contagion in online group discussions, examining language as a mechanism of emotional contagion. In a lab study 235 participants interacted online with a partner who was an electronic confederate. We manipulated exposure to emotional language to test how a partner’s use of positive versus negative emotional language impacts participants’ felt emotions and their displayed emotional language. Status of one’s partner was manipulated to test how status moderates emotional contagion. We find that felt emotions are contagious in an online setting. Further, partner’s emotional language affect participant’s use of emotional language. We examine whether participant’s emotional language mediates the effect of partner’s emotional language on participant’s felt emotion and find some evidence for mediation through negative emotional language when interacting with a high-status partner. By controlling partner’s language, we find that positive emotional language of one’s partner leads to more group reflection and less perception of conflict, both task and relational.

Bio:

Portrait of Aimée A. Kane

Aimée A. Kane

Aimée A. Kane is an Associate Professor of Management at the Palumbo-Donahue School of Business at Duquesne University. Dr. Kane’s research focuses on group processes and reveals how members come together, learn, and collaborate effectively, despite the boundaries that separate them. Her research contributes to the organizational sciences, psychological sciences, communication sciences, and computer sciences. It has been published in key journals, conference proceedings, and handbooks, and won awards. Small Group Research awarded her article Language and group processes: An integrative, interdisciplinary review a Best Article Award. The Academy of Management identified “Am I still one of them?”: Bicultural immigrant managers navigating social identity threats when spanning global boundaries as a finalist for the International Human Resource Management Scholarly Research Award. The Palumbo-School of Business awarded her a Harry W. Witt Faculty Fellowship, and awards for research excellence. Dr. Kane is currently an associate editor at Group Dynamics: Theory, Research and Practice and on the editorial boards of the Academy of Management Discoveries and Organization Science journals. She holds a Ph.D. and a M.S. in organizational behavior and theory from the Tepper School of Business at Carnegie Mellon University and a B.A. from Duke University, where she was elected to Phi Beta Kappa. Prior to joining Duquesne, Kane was an Assistant Professor of Management and Organizations at New York University’s Stern School of Business.

Additional details are on her website: https://sites.google.com/site/aimeeakane

Virtual on Zoom

Speaker:
Aimée A. Kane
Associate Professor of Management
Palumbo-Donahue School of Business
Duquesne University

Abstract:
This study examines emotional contagion in online group discussions, examining language as a mechanism of emotional contagion. In a lab study 235 participants interacted online with a partner who was an electronic confederate. We manipulated exposure to emotional language to test how a partner’s use of positive versus negative emotional language impacts participants’ felt emotions and their displayed emotional language. Status of one’s partner was manipulated to test how status moderates emotional contagion. We find that felt emotions are contagious in an online setting. Further, partner’s emotional language affect participant’s use of emotional language. We examine whether participant’s emotional language mediates the effect of partner’s emotional language on participant’s felt emotion and find some evidence for mediation through negative emotional language when interacting with a high-status partner. By controlling partner’s language, we find that positive emotional language of one’s partner leads to more group reflection and less perception of conflict, both task and relational.

Bio:

Portrait of Aimée A. Kane

Aimée A. Kane

Aimée A. Kane is an Associate Professor of Management at the Palumbo-Donahue School of Business at Duquesne University. Dr. Kane’s research focuses on group processes and reveals how members come together, learn, and collaborate effectively, despite the boundaries that separate them. Her research contributes to the organizational sciences, psychological sciences, communication sciences, and computer sciences. It has been published in key journals, conference proceedings, and handbooks, and won awards. Small Group Research awarded her article Language and group processes: An integrative, interdisciplinary review a Best Article Award. The Academy of Management identified “Am I still one of them?”: Bicultural immigrant managers navigating social identity threats when spanning global boundaries as a finalist for the International Human Resource Management Scholarly Research Award. The Palumbo-School of Business awarded her a Harry W. Witt Faculty Fellowship, and awards for research excellence. Dr. Kane is currently an associate editor at Group Dynamics: Theory, Research and Practice and on the editorial boards of the Academy of Management Discoveries and Organization Science journals. She holds a Ph.D. and a M.S. in organizational behavior and theory from the Tepper School of Business at Carnegie Mellon University and a B.A. from Duke University, where she was elected to Phi Beta Kappa. Prior to joining Duquesne, Kane was an Assistant Professor of Management and Organizations at New York University’s Stern School of Business.

Additional details are on her website: https://sites.google.com/site/aimeeakane

Zoom Registration Link