Mapping the Geography of Racism: DCIC Project Credited As An Inspiration To Other Projects

Mapping the Geography of Racism: DCIC Project Credited As An Inspiration To Other Projects

Mapping Inequality, a project of the DCIC through Maryland's iSchool,  has been highlighted by several sources for inspiring other projects and placing it in the context of a House bill aiming at restricting the release of this kind of data.

About the project, the National Council on Public History says 'Historians have long understood the importance of redlining. Yet by leveraging GIS to organize, analyze, and display historic data about this practice, an interdisciplinary team of scholars re-told a familiar story in way that made it accessible for a popular audience.  They want on to develop a project inspired in part by Mapping Inequality. (Read more here)

Additionally, the project has been featured on the HASTAC (Humanities, Arts, Science, and Technology Alliance and Collaboratory), which is an interdisciplinary community of humanists, artists, social scientists, scientists, and technologists that are changing the way we teach and learn.  Their 13,000+ members from over 400+ affiliate organizations share news, tools, research, insights, pedagogy, methods, and projects--including Digital Humanities and other born-digital scholarship--and collaborate on various HASTAC initiatives. Founded in 2002, HASTAC is reputed to be the world’s first and oldest academic social network with annual pageview counts approaching the half-million mark.  HASTAC’s central administration is divided between hubs located at Duke University and the Graduate Center at the City University of New York.  (Read more here)