Katie Shilton to Join Faculty at Maryland’s iSchool | Maryland's iSchool - College of Information Studies | Entry(446) - Graduate Program - University Of Maryland

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Katie Shilton to Join Faculty at Maryland’s iSchool

The University of Maryland’s College of Information Studies, Maryland’s iSchool, welcomes Katie Shilton to its faculty. She is an assistant professor and senior research fellow with the Information Policy and Access Center (IPAC). Shilton is a 2011 Ph.D. graduate of the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA).

Shilton’s research examines the social and ethical implications of emerging technologies. For her dissertation, Shilton worked with UCLA’s Center for Embedded Network Sensing (CENS), analyzing how to incorporate social values into the design process of mobile apps. Her current research examines the same sorts of information policy issues in the realm of network architecture for the Internet. “Programmers, computer scientists and others involved with developing new technologies have a huge influence on how the new technology ultimately impacts society,” she says. “My research looks for ways to incorporate social values on matters such as information security and privacy of personal data from the very beginning of the design process, rather than trying to impose them later.”

As a graduate student, Shilton was a co-recipient of two National Science Foundation (NSF) grants. For one of those grants, Shilton is working with UCLA film professor Jeff Burke on a series of web videos presenting how ethics have spurred scientific and technological innovation in fields such as genetics and open-source software.

Shilton has a BA in history and German studies from Oberlin College. In addition to her PhD, she has a Master of Library Science degree with a focus in archival studies from UCLA. She will be teaching courses related to information policy and archives.